Free For All

Share on facebook
Share on Facebook
Share on twitter
Tweet This
Share on linkedin
Post on LinkedIn
I am a tooltip

Have you ever thought about how much the little charges really do turn off potential customers?

You’re driving down the road one day and a dashboard sensor goes off: your tires are low on air. Okay, no big deal, you say to yourself. So you go on the hunt for an air machine. Gas stations everywhere have the air pumps that you need – but they all cost at least a dollar to use. And hopefully the dollar is enough for all four tires.

A dollar? For AIR?! I get air every time I step outside. What a rip off…

You know that you can get air at a local tire shop so you decide to just wait until you can get there. Suddenly, you see it. The clouds part and you swear you hear a chorus of heavenly voices, singing their praises. You have found the coveted place; you have found a gas station that doesn’t charge for air!

You pull into the parking lot, get all four tires aired up, and get back in the car. But now you realize that you need gas. Well, thankfully I’m already here. You go inside to pay for gas and end up grabbing a water. You also decide to get a snack. Oh, and your wife mentioned before you left the house that she had a migraine, so you pick up some ibuprofen, too. You get the counter to pay and see the current lottery jackpot is at 200 million dollars. Why not? It feels like my lucky day.

Before you know it, you’ve spent $50 at a gas station – all because they offered free air. No gimmicks, no fine print, just a decent gesture.

Let’s do some easy math. Say fifteen people stop for air each day. Every third person that stops for *free* air will go inside and spend $10.

Charge $1 for air? You make $15.

Free air? You make $50.

Sounds like a smart business move, doesn’t it? It’s also an EASY business move. Companies have a goal of helping their customers with a specific problem, or a “pain point.” There’s a step above this that you can take, though. Stop looking at just one pain point. Look at your target audience as a whole and ask yourself, “What other pain points can I help ease?” When you start addressing multiple pain points, you become a one-stop-shop. Not only will your customers look to you for help with your primary focus, but you will ease their mind by showing that you can handle a variety of issues.

Maybe this summer, you can find small pain points that you can help ease for little to no cost. Take it for a test drive and see how it does. You may find that customers will start going out of their way just for a little breath of fresh air from you.

Amber L. Jewell

Amber L. Jewell

Amber Jewell is the "Duchess of Flow" for BigPromotions.net, as well as an award-nominated author on business relationships. When she's not writing blogs or books, her work is focused on managing the office of BigPromotions. The rest of her time is spent being a mom and wife, homeschooling, reading, and painting.