Why Follow Ups are Important

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Salespeople usually focus on one main goal: making the sale. But we all know that sales is about building relationships. We need to create conversations and build trust with our customers. One way to do this is through follow ups. While phone calls can be more personal, emails seem to be a faster and more convenient way to follow up with your customers. Here’s an example:

Hey Jane,
Now that our project is complete, I wanted to touch base with you and see how things went. Was there something I could have done differently to make the experience even better? I greatly appreciate the chance to work with you. If you know anyone else who would benefit from what I do, let me know!
Thanks,
John Smith

Follow up emails work well because they provide communication that isn’t just about sales. During a follow up, be personable and do not try to sell anything. This is supposed to be a way to check in and make sure a previous sale went well, as well as allow the customer to ask any questions. Also, find out if there’s anything you can change in order to up your game.

Referrals are also a great way to utilize follow ups. This is the time to ask your customer for a few names or to spread the word about your service. Let them know that you appreciate their loyalty and would love to provide the same excellent services for others.

One final note: Use your signature tools to make follow ups even easier! Create an email signature with the entire email and simply change the name and any specific details before you send it. This way you can save time and remain consistent.

Amber L. Jewell

Amber L. Jewell

Amber Jewell is the "Duchess of Flow" for BigPromotions.net, as well as an award-nominated author on business relationships. When she's not writing blogs or books, her work is focused on managing the office of BigPromotions. The rest of her time is spent being a mom and wife, homeschooling, reading, and painting.